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Should fertility be considered a public good?

Nowadays a huge debate is being discussed in Italy after the introduction of the “Fertility day”, promoted by the Health Minister Beatrice Lorenzin. This day was thought to stress public attention to the importance of fertility and to underline the danger of falling country birth rates. The reaction has been fierce, with many questioning if there may exist a better way to encourage people to have children.

Actually what has caused such an anger is not just the idea of procreation as a matter for the government to intervene in, but the images associated with women’s role, considered as sexist and ageist[1].

Despite moral criticism, it is important to see the question from an economic point of view. Are we sure that “fertility” should be considered as a public good?  Economists are used to refer to public good as a non-rivalrous and non-excludable item. It is basically a product that one individual can consume or enjoy without limiting its availability to any other individual. Public goods are, by definition, provided by the mean of government in order to avoid free riding issues. In that sense “fertility” is not a public good because there is no direct intervention from a central authority. Neither the intervention seems to be needed as a way to repair a market failure. There is no market failure in having too few children. Most people may agree that having a child is a very personal decision based on own values, circumstances and life or career goals. Some people want to have children, some do not, some might only want them later: all choices are equally logic. One may say that people are free to set their own level of children, even if it is zero, and that government should not intervene in this kind of decision. It should NOT, but it is forced to. Because low birth rate is a primary concern to government and to society as a whole. As a matter of fact, many countries are experiencing the problems of an ageing population and have taken measures to try to influence their birth rates since these affect pension system and standard of living[2]. If a country succeeds in setting an optimum level of population, then their people will have a better quality of life due to an increase in services, infrastructures, incomes. But there are still many implications on the public finance side. One of them is a redistribution issue: if maternity and housing benefits will be provided with taxation then people who are not keen on having a child (because they don’t want or they cannot) will subsidize the couples with a parenthood willingness. Another question would be: is it better to offer cash transfer in order to pay children stuff or to provide in kind services as healthcare and nursery? It’s clear that this phenomenon involves all of us, besides the weak economic framework that is triggering our society by a decade. Roughly speaking, the decision of having a child affects also the ones who do not.

Many weird proposals had been already thought such as giving a flyer about how to flirt (South Korea), divulgate fairytales (Japan) or invite couples to take a holiday (Denmark)[3] but in the meanwhile, population continues to age, affecting all welfare state and above all social security and pension system.

Thus “fertility” may be not a public good, but rather a public concern.

[1] https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/sep/05/italys-fertility-day-posters-sexist-echoes-of-fascist-past

 

[2] http://www.oecdobserver.org/news/archivestory.php/aid/563/Can_governments_influence_population_growth_.html

 

[3] http://mentalfloss.com/article/33485/6-creative-ways-countries-have-tried-their-birth-rates

 

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Author: studentnovasbe

Master student in Nova Sbe

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